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Posts for: September, 2014

AchievingaTransformedSmileWithPorcelainVeneersorCrowns

Today's cosmetic dentist can bring amazing transformations to their patient's smiles. That's because we now have a versatile array of materials and processes that precisely replicate the appearance of natural teeth.

Two of the most useful are porcelain veneers and crowns. Although different in structure and function, veneers and crowns both utilize a material known as dental porcelain, a ceramic material that can be shaped to resemble an individual patient's natural tooth shape, with the same color, hue saturation and translucence as the original or surrounding teeth.

As the name implies, veneers are a thin layer of dental porcelain that adheres to the outer surface of a tooth, essentially as a replacement for enamel. They solve a number of esthetic issues patients have with their teeth, especially those in front: poor color, shape and contours; broken teeth; poor tooth position; and staining that can't be removed with conventional bleaching. They most often require minimal tooth preparation, as only 1 mm or less of tooth enamel needs to be removed. Occasionally, no tooth reduction is required.

However, they are not a good solution where there is not an adequate amount of tooth structure to work with. In this case, a crown may be the best choice. A crown (or cap) covers the remaining tooth structure completely, reinforcing the remaining tooth structure 360°. This is an excellent choice for patients who have lost a large amount of tooth structure due to decay, trauma or grinding habits that have eroded the enamel.

To determine if you are a true candidate for either of these applications you should undergo a smile analysis in our office. During this process it's even possible to create a diagnostic mock-up — a “trial smile,” if you will — with temporary tooth-colored materials applied to your teeth and then photographed for your review.

The smile analysis helps us recommend the best solution for you and in turn will help you make an informed choice on the right application for you. Although either option may not be feasible in all situations, they may just be the right choice to change your smile for the better.

If you would like more information on how porcelain veneers and crowns can help transform your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Crowns and Veneers.”


By Berger Family Dental
September 26, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
PadmaLakshmisSmileARecipeforBeauty

Before she began hosting the long-running TV competition Top Chef, Padma Lakshmi was a well-known model and successful cookbook author. (Appropriately, she is said to have been “discovered” by a modeling agent while sitting in a café in Madrid.) Yet the Indian-born beauty's striking look — at once exotic and familiar — doesn't come from any cookie-cutter mold.

So when Lakshmi had cosmetic work done on her teeth, early in her career, her dentist didn't use a cookie-cutter approach either: Instead, her smile was carefully designed, using small amounts of bonding material to brighten her teeth and to bring their shape and spacing into harmony with her facial features.

Dentistry by Design
What exactly is smile design — and what could it do for you? Essentially, it's the process of evaluating your smile in concert with the appearance of your entire face, and visualizing the changes — some dramatic and some subtle — that will make it really shine. Some aspects we consider include the face's shape, the proportion or “balance” of facial features, the complexion, eye and lip color and form, and the overall dimensions of the smile.

Based on dental aesthetics and clinical experience, we will probably have a number of suggestions to make on how you can improve your smile. Your input will also be very important; while some individuals prefer perfectly even teeth and a sparkling “Hollywood white” smile, others are looking for a result that's more in keeping with a “natural” look: slight irregularities in tooth shape, spacing, and even color.

There's no right or wrong answer here: Having a “perfect” smile means what's perfect for you, so it's very important for dentists and patients to communicate openly during the smile design process. But sometimes, words alone just aren't enough to convey the subtle dimensions of beauty.

The Trial Smile
Fortunately, it's now possible to preview your “perfect” smile using a number of different techniques. Advances in computer imaging make this the first step in previewing your new smile — you can see the changes before a single tooth is touched! Still, many people find that having a more concrete picture is helpful. The next step is to make a 3-D mock-up the proposed dental work on an actual model of your mouth. That way, you can see a physical representation of the final results — and even turn it around and hold it in your hands.

There's still one more way to really experience the difference cosmetic treatments can make without committing to a permanent change: the provisional restoration. Here, tooth-colored bonding material and other techniques are used to actually create the new smile — temporarily. This gives you time to “live with it,” and see if the proposed changes work for you. If everything goes well with the provisional work, the permanent restoration is guaranteed to please.

So if you want holiday treats, get out the cookie cutter — but if you're looking for a smile that's uniquely yours, and one that enhances your own individual appearance… call our office and ask about a smile design consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Great Expectations — Perceptions in Smile Design” and “Beautiful Smiles by Design.”


By Berger Family Dental
September 18, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth decay   toothache  
WhatToDoAboutAChildsToothache

It's 3:00 PM, your child has just come back from the school playground — and she's complaining of a toothache that's making her miserable. She can't seem to say if there was a particular injury or a blow, but the more she talks about it, the worse it gets. You're the parent... what are you going to do now?

If you've ever been through this type of situation, you know that a calm demeanor and a little TLC can go a long way. But how do you know whether you're facing a dental emergency, or a routine booboo? Here are a few general rules that may help.

First, relax: Without a fever and facial swelling, a child's toothache isn't usually an emergency. But any tooth pain that keeps a child up at night or lasts into the next day should be evaluated by a dentist. Even if it's nothing but a small cavity (the most common cause of toothache) you don't want to let it go untreated. That could allow it to turn from a small discomfort into a major problem — like a painful abscess.

There are some things you can do at home to try and get a handle on what's causing the pain. Encourage the child to show you exactly where the pain is located, and to tell you when and how it started. Then, examine the area closely. Look for obvious brown spots, or even tiny cavities (holes) on biting surfaces or between teeth, which might indicate decay. Also check the gums surrounding the tooth, to see if there are sores or swelling.

You may find evidence of a traumatic injury, like a cut or bruise — or, if only swelling is apparent, it may mean an abscess has formed. If nothing looks amiss, try gently flossing on either side of the hurting tooth. This may dislodge a particle of food that's causing pain and pressure.

If the pain persists, you can try giving an appropriate dose of ibuprofen or acetaminophen, or applying an ice pack on the outside of the jaw — one minute on and one minute off. But even if you can make the immediate pain go away, don't neglect the situation that caused it. Unless you're absolutely sure you know why the toothache occurred, you should bring the child in for an examination. It will put your mind at rest — and maybe prevent a bigger problem down the road.

If you have questions about toothaches in children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “A Child's Toothache.”


By Berger Family Dental
September 10, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
HowWeDeterminetheBestWaytoFixYourSmile

We all know that dentistry can do amazing things these days to give you the smile you've always dreamed of. With the latest cosmetic and restorative dental techniques, it is possible to achieve amazingly natural-looking results. But how do we map out the best route to a better smile? And how do we know that the results will hold up over time?

Every individual has a unique set of conditions in his or her mouth and it is our job to figure out how you have come to your present state, dentally speaking. We need to correct or at least manage any factors that could risk the success of your treatment. These risk factors fall into four basic categories:

Periodontal Risk — This involves the condition of the structures that support your teeth, including your gum and bone tissue. It's important to establish good periodontal health before we perform any restorative or cosmetic procedures.

Biomechanical Risk — This has to do with the structural integrity of your teeth. We will look at whether any tooth structure has been lost due to decay, and take steps to reduce your susceptibility to decay if necessary.

Functional Risk — This relates to your bite: how your teeth, muscles and jaw joints are functioning. For example, do you have excessive tooth wear or joint pain? If so, you are at a higher risk in this category and we need to figure out why.

Aesthetic Risk — This is the most subjective of the categories as beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Still, if you display a lot of your teeth and gums when you smile, any issues you have (gum recession, for example) will be that much more visible and affect your smile more. We will have to take this into account when we plan your treatment.

Only when we have determined how best to minimize your risk in all four of these categories can we restore or enhance your smile in a way that will not only look great but also last as long as possible.

If you have any questions about cosmetic or restorative dental treatment, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Berger Family Dental
September 02, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsaboutFixedDentures

Q: Is there much of a difference between fixed and removable dentures?
A: There’s a BIG difference! Removable dentures are the type your grandparents might have had — and possibly their grandparents, too. They work well enough after you get used to them, but there’s always the issue of slippage, poor fit, limited function… and potential embarrassment. Modern fixed dentures, however, get their stability from today’s state-of-the-art system for tooth replacement: dental implants. They won’t loosen or slip, they function and “feel” like your own natural teeth, and they can last for years and years to come.

Q: How are fixed dentures supported?
A: Each arch (set of teeth comprising the top or bottom jaw) of a fixed denture is anchored into the jaw bone by four or more dental implants. These small screw-like devices, made of titanium metal, are placed into the jawbone in a minor surgical procedure. Once set in place, they remain permanently attached by both mechanical forces and osseointegration — the process in which living bone cells actually become fused with the metal implants themselves.

Q: What is the procedure for getting dental implants like?
A: Before having any work done, you will receive a thorough examination and have a set of diagnostic images made. Implant surgery is normally performed in the dental office, using local anesthesia or conscious sedation. If any failing teeth must be extracted (removed), that will be done first. Next, small openings are made in the gums and the jawbone, and the implants are placed in precise locations. Sometimes, a set of temporary teeth can be attached to the implants immediately; other times, the implants will be allowed to heal for a period of time.

Q: Besides added stability, are there other advantages to fixed dentures?
A: Yes! As they become integrated in the jaw, dental implants actually help preserve the quantity and quality of bone in the jaw; removable dentures, on the other hand, decrease bone quantity and quality. This is important because the jawbone plays a vital role in supporting facial features like lips and cheeks. When the facial features lose support, it can make a person look prematurely aged. Also, people who wear removable dentures often have trouble eating “challenging” foods like raw fruits and vegetables (which are highly nutritious), and opt for softer, more processed (and less nutritious) foods. With fixed dentures, however, you can eat the foods you like.

Q: Aren't fixed dentures with dental implants more expensive?
A: Initially, the answer is yes — but in the long run, they may not be. Unlike removable dentures, which inevitably need to be re-lined or remade as the jawbone shrinks, fixed dentures can last for the rest of your life. They don’t require adhesives or creams, and you will never have to take them out at night and clean them. In fact, you can think of them as a long-term investment in yourself that pays off with a better quality of life!

If you’d like more information on fixed dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Missing Teeth.”




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